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Article

IS A NEW METRO LINE A MEAN FOR SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY AMONG COMMUTERS? THE CASE OF THESSALONIKI CITY

2 / 2 / 98-106 Pages

Author(s)

Nikolaos Gavanas - Transport Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki -

Ioannis Politis - Transport Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki -

Konstantinos Dovas - Transport Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki -

Emmanouil Lianakis - Transport Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki -


Abstract

No one can argue that fix route transport systems, like metro, can significantly contribute to the target of sustainable mobility by shifting a large number of persons from their current transport mode of choice – in most cases private cars. However, the individual characteristics of the traveller (like the trip purpose and the socioeconomic background) can affect the demand for such a transport mode. In this context, the paper aims to develop a methodology for the investigation of the impact of these characteristics on the potential use of the new Metro System of Thessaloniki by daily commuters. More specific, a questionnaire survey based on stated preference techniques is developed and a pilot application is conducted at the area of three future metro stations with different geographic location and economic profile. The pilot application showed daily commuters of middle and high income are more frequent users of private cars. Approximately the ¾ of commuters with destination to the city centre are expected to shift to the metro, while the corresponding share for through traffic commuters is diminished due to the dependence on the private car for large distance work trips.


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Acknowledgements:

This paper was presented at REACT Conference “The International Conference on Climate Friendly Transport”, which was held in Belgrade, Serbia, on May 16-17, 2011.


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