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Article

PREVAILING SATURATION FLOW RATE FOR LANE GROUPS IN AN URBAN AREA

DOI: 10.7708/ijtte.2016.6(2).10


6 / 2 / 231-242 Pages

Author(s)

Stephen Arhin - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Howard University, Washington, DC, 20059, United States of America -

Melissa F. Anderson - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Howard University, Washington, DC, 20059, United States of America -

Regis Stinson - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Howard University, Washington, DC, 20059, United States of America -

Asteway Ribbiso - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Howard University, Washington, DC, 20059, United States of America -


Abstract

This study focused on determining the prevailing Saturation Flow Rate (SFR) for specific lane groups in an urban area: District of Columbia (DC). The lane groups considered were Through (T), shared Through and Right (TR), shared Through and Left (TL), and exclusive Left turn (L) lane groups. These SFR values could then be used to calculate the local base SFR. The study determined the prevailing SFR for these lane groups based on data collected at 81 intersections. The hypothesis that the mean SFRs for all the lane groups are different was tested at a 5% level of significance. From the results, the mean prevailing SFR for the T, TR, TL and L lane groups were 1,559, 1,461, 1,566 and 1,460 vphpl respectively. Those prevailing SFRs can be used for planning analyses in the District of Columbia. The results also indicated that these mean prevailing SFRs are statistically similar at 95% confidence interval. Based on the results, a local base SFR for the City can be determined for each lane group.


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Acknowledgements:

The authors acknowledge the District Department of Transportation for funding and supporting this study.


References:

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